The museums participating on the project aim at re-evaluating and rethinking their resources: archives, collections and working methods in order to develop their potentials by creating knowledge and connecting the various types of audiences. The traditional roles of the contemporary art museum are changing: its most important activities are no longer merely storage, studying and exhibiting of artworks, but also an active involvement with the museum’s audience. For this reason, the project will develop combination of exhibitions ans educational programs based on participatory approach, intended for both, the audience and the staff.

Events

The museums participating on the project aim at re-evaluating and rethinking their resources: archives, collections and working methods in order to develop their potentials by creating knowledge and connecting the various types of audiences. The traditional roles of the contemporary art museum are changing: its most important activities are no longer merely storage, studying and exhibiting of artworks, but also an active involvement with the museum’s audience. For this reason, the project will develop combination of exhibitions ans educational programs based on participatory approach, intended for both, the audience and the staff.


Research Process - Interpretors

In January 2015 we have invited interpretors to conduce a research in our institutions. All the interpretors are related to the artistic production but their profile came from different fields. Their commission is to generate different approaches around the museistic issues, around the collections or around the archive.

Interpretors Production

Production period for the interpretors before the experimetal exhibitions in each institution.


Mediations of Art. International seminar

The lectures will focus on the ways of communicating art to visitors with the aim of improving the understanding of, interest in and experience of contemporary art, and on good practices in educational and cultural institutions and independent organisations.

Pedagogues, professionals and curators are invited to participate. As the seminar is organised in the context of an international project, the lectures will be held in English and open to the broader public, too.

Schedule:

11:00 - 11:15 Welcome address to participants: Andreja Hribernik, Director of KGLU
11:15 - 12:00 Barbara Borčić, SCCA, Centre For Contemporary Arts, Ljubljana
World of Art. School for curators and critics of contemporary art

12:00 - 12:45 Bojana Piškur, Museum of Modern Art, Ljubljana
Museum - a space of the common / The case of Radical Education

12:45 - 13:45 Lunch break

13.45 - 14:30 Franc Purg, artist, temporary art teacher
How to become an animal or an artist

14:30 - 15:15 Nina Popič, Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art Koroška
ŠKART kolektiv (Dragan Protić, Djordje Balmazović)
KLGU practice and presentation of ŠKART projects:
I do not know, you do not know, but together we will know

15:15 - 15:30 Coffee break

15:30 - 15:50 Nada Beroš, Museum of Contemporary Art Zagreb
Is this Art?

15:50 - 16:10 Jovan Jakšić, Museum of Contemporary Art Vojvodina, Novi Sad
Education in the MSUV:
Performing the Museum - Performing the Audience

16:10 - 16:30 Linda Valdés and Núria Solé Bardalet. Fundació Antoni Tàpies.
Barcelona.
The archive as educational tool: Open Source Prototypes Project


Performing the Museum Exhibition

Minister of Culture, Julijana Bizjak Mlakar, M.A., will be the official speaker at the opening and she will also open the exhibition. Elke aus dem Moore, Head of the Visual Arts Department at IFA (Institute of Foreign Cultural Relations of the Federal Republic of Germany) and Andrej Čas, Mayor of the Municipality of Slovenj Gradec, will also address the audience at the opening.

Public tour of the exhibition – with Andreja Hribernik, Director of KGLU, and Barbara Steiner, curator of the exhibition Collection Reversed: Transfer, Transformation and Ruptures and Henry Moore comes back. – will take place on the opening day, 23 October 2015, at 6 pm.

The exhibition Performing the Museum (Muzej v gibanju) is taking place in the frame of the international project. The two-year project is focused on the role of the contemporary museum. Nowadays, the museum is no longer just an institution storing, studying and exhibiting artworks, but rather an institution that actively participates with its audiences. Hence, the project is developing a combination of exhibitions, educational programmes and activities based on a participatory approach, creating knowledge and introducing new models of mediating art. The project is supported by the European Union as part of its Creative Europe programme.


Performing the Museum Opening

Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art Koroška (KGLU) cordially invites You and Your friends to the opening of the exhibition Performing the Museum (Muzej v gibanju) on Friday, 23 October 2015, at 7 pm at the Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art Koroška, Glavni trg 24, Slovenj Gradec, Slovenia.


Performing the Museum: Archives and Power / Arhiv i moć, Building Desire / Zidati želju - Jasmina Cibic

Exhibition ARCHIVES AND POWER / ARCHIVES AND POWER examines the concept of archives as accumulated knowledge produced by different types of institutions, as well as other organized structures of society or individuals. Although the archives of "primary sources" carries the label of neutrality, the methodology of accumulation that the archive represent is a design that engages the social, political and technological power. The epistemological role of the archives, as well as their symbolic capital, are proportionate and are situated in the system of power production. Digital technology has spurred a fascinated wave on archives bringing us into a new era of archive fever (Derrida). One extreme of this trend is romanticizing the past and the abolition of political as a part of a deliberate or accidental design memory. The other extreme is the introduction of the current ideological and realpolitik as a way to remember. The relation between memory and archive sets an aporia on the archive fever that says that (do not) forget the archive to remember what’s happened.


Opening Performing the Museum: Archives and Power, Building Desire - Jasmina Cibic

Simposium: Archive and power

How to Do Things with Documents Opening

How to Do Things with Documents Exhibition

The archive of the Fundació Antoni Tàpies contains a postcard that highlights the relation that existed between Hans Haacke and Manuel Borja-Villel during the exhibition Hans Haacke. ‘Obra Social’, 1995. The artist thanks the then director of the Fundació for recommending a holiday destination.

The archive of the Fundació’s activities is a space where contemporary art discourses come face to face with the praxis. It thus becomes an indispensable resource for institutional critique and, above all, for a revision of the emergency forms that have become part of the critical discourses in art, and which an institution such as the Fundació has consolidated within its context throughout its twenty-five years of existence.

What can mediation in museums teach us? To what extent can institutional critique and curatorial research generate not only artworks but alternatives? Is the archive an appropriate space for testing other policies in culture and in art?

Roger Bernat, Lúa Coderch, Experimentem amb l’art, LaFundició, Objectologies and Pep Vidal were invited by the Fundació to carry out research work on the archive. During 2015 they have conducted approximations to the registers of mediation from different perspectives and methods of analysis, resulting in collaborations with various organisations and agents from the socio-cultural world.

How to Do Things with Documents is not, therefore, yet another exhibition based on the archive or institutional critique. It is an exhibition in the archive, an intervention carried out right at the heart of the institution. Basically it takes place within the office space of the Fundació and includes initiatives that require travelling to other places, such as a day of exchanges between the staff of the Fundació and teachers from Escola Dovella (24 November) and a workshop for the creation of an archive on slums and the informal town of L’Hospitalet de Llobregat (25 to 28 November).

On 2 and 3 November there will be two evening sessions with live presentations of the research carried out by the artists. Also taking part will be the project’s international partners, Performing the Museum.

The team of Performing the Museum at the Fundació Antoni Tàpies includes Oriol Fontdevila (curator), Núria Solé Bardalet (coordinator) and Linda Valdés (activities organiser).


Performing the Museum: On resources

Seminar (Baunet caffe) and presentations of art works in the permanent exhibition space and on the Media facade of the MCA.

Collections, archives and libraries form basic museum resources. But behind collections, there are strategies, purchases, and certain planned decisions, traces of which can be found in institutional archives, while libraries provide evidence of the conditions in which knowledge is produced and transmitted within museum activities. On the other hand, the institutional history, intergenerational transfer of knowledge, methodology and social capital, which connect individual art institutions with the local or international scene, are among the most significant, through often less visible resources possessed by institutions in the world of culture.

The international project Izvedba muzeja/Performing the Museum offers artists, researchers and the public not only museum collections and archives, but the written, unwritten and potential history which runs like a thread through a programme of events bringing invited artists, theoreticians, researchers and the public into the museum fabric. Lecture series, artistic presentations and discussions to be held in the Baunet Cafe and permanent exhibition space of the Museum of Contemporary Art are designed to point to possible interpretations and new readings of both the material and the non-material, intangible resources within and without institutional culture and art.

In the first part of the seminar, Dunja Kučinac and Matija Mrakovčić will give a lecture about the Centre for Documenting Independent Culture, Tihana Puc will talk about creating portfolios, and about exhibitions, artists, institutions and what connects them, while representatives of partner institutions and their associates involved in the Performing the Museum project – Andreja Hribernik of the Carinthian Gallery of Fine Arts, Sanja Kojić Mladenov and Gordana Nikolić of the Vojvodina Museum of Contemporary Art, Oriol Fontevilla of the Antoni Tàpies Foundation and Jasna Jakšić of the Museum of Contemporary Art in Zagreb, in cooperation with designer Rafaela Dražić – will present their institutions, resources and productions. Ana Kutleša will present research on private archives in the Information and Documentation Department of the Museum of Contemporary Art, and on the position of museum in archives at a time when there are increasing demands for commercialised, commodified public goods, such as museums and museum activities.

Through a restaging of his performance, Dalibor Martinis will address the history and collections of the Museum of Contemporary Art in Zagreb within the context of the Performing the Museum project. He will talk to curator Leila Topić about the performance, entitled A Guard at the Exhibition, which was first performed in 1976 as part of the Confrontations exhibition held at the Gallery of Contemporary Art. Dimitrije Bašićević Mangelos, the exhibition curator, staged reproductions of works of art and writings about art, alongside works from the contemporary art collection and the Benko Horvat collection, while Dalibor Martinis performed the act of preserving art. Today, almost forty years later, some of the works from that exhibition are in the Museum’s permanent collection, while photographs of the performance by Dalibor Martinis and Željko Jerman, along with a catalogue and copy of the invitation, comprise the only documentation currently available regarding that exhibition.

The Fokus group (Iva Kovač and Elvis Krstulović) will contribute to the permanent collection and present to public leaders a work called Priče o okvirima/Stories of Frames, which addresses institutional productions on the context, perception and valorisation of works of art. A basic digital database is under production, which the Fokus group are developing as part of the project, collecting and organising data on institutions of modern and contemporary art at the international level. Written contributions to the museum set-up provide information about various events in connection with the establishment, development and leadership of institutions of global modern and contemporary art, which tend not to be acknowledged in the historical artistic narrative. Text cards index the development of the artistic infrastructure context, parallel to the development of artistic production, which is presented in the museum set-up.

The Danish artist Søren Thilo Funder will talk about the work he produced during a period of residence at the Museum of Contemporary Art in April 2015. A film will be shown on the media wall in the permanent collection, showing a renowned painting, Pafama, by Josip Seissel, while a science fiction story by the American writer Philip K. Dick, Nicholas Brady, is read aloud. The Cold War apocalyptic vision of Dick’s story, in which abstract art plays a major role, actually plays out in the Museum of Contemporary Art in Zagreb.


Stories of frames.

At the end of 2014, when we were invited to participate in the "Performing the Museum" project, which would enable us to work with the museum resources, our interest was in accessing the contents of the archives, library and collection. As the project developed and we spent time and worked in the museum, it turned out that we would be less interested in the contents at the disposal of the museum, and more in the (work of the) museum itself. In a specific way, the ‘Performing the Museum’ project made us focus on inter-museum communication — between the interpreters, the institution, and its staff.

In the early phase of the research, we learned how the ‘Didactic Exhibition’ was staged in 1957 by the Gallery of Contemporary Art in Zagreb (now the Museum of Contemporary Art). This exhibition, performed by the museum, did not present works of art. Instead, via reproductions of canonical works of art, it made the subject of its presentation the (western) modernist, art-historical canon. Without concealing its role models, the ‘Didactic Exhibition’ in fact started with a translation of the diagram ‘Cubism and Abstract Art’. The three-year-old Gallery thus heralded its future
programme and field of reference in the context of the still relatively unstable position of modern art in Yugoslavia. Deliberately or not, by appropriating existing material and adding typed explanations, the Gallery strove to legitimise its future work by performing the story of modern art, as an American story about European artefacts.1

Although the ‘Didactic Exhibition’, as an explicit example of revealing one’s own ideology, could be interpreted as a harbinger of new institutionalism, it was a performative utterance rather than a practice of critical museology. On the other hand, the recreation of the ‘Didactic Exhibition’ today reveals the interpretative mechanisms of the museum. Perhaps the most interesting example of similar practice can be found in recreations of canonical exhibitions such as ‘The Last Futurist Exhibition’, or ‘An International Exhibition of Modern Art – Armory Show’, by Goran Đorđević. In his reading, an art institution is a collective term for a system of beliefs, or ideology of art history, whose basic cultural artefacts are objects which today we call works of art, but which at some future time may become something else, just as religious paintings or African masks used to have different social functions before they entered the museum.2

While Goran Đorđević points to the key historical manifestations, institutions and personalities of the art world in order to speak about the emergence and development of ideology of art history, his work simultaneously implies a question: what remains of the art institution if we place ourselves outside the story of art history? The initial motivation for the ‘Stories About Frames’ project, which we realised through ‘Performing the Museum’, was for us a kind of exploration of this question. We decided to shift our focus from artistic discourse to the material reality of art institutions. In doing so, we did not concentrate on art objects, but on institutions of modern and contemporary art, treating them as the cultural artefacts which participate in the creation of the story of art history. For the purposes of our research, we borrowed some of the methods and tools used in empirical research. We decided to create a digital database to gather and organise information on institutions of modern and contemporary art. Such tools were to provide us with an objective view from the outside, while striving to exclude or minimise qualitative judgments at the moment of organising and selecting the data. The database began as an expression of our desire to include existing institutions of modern and contemporary art worldwide, from their inception to the present day, in order to achieve a picture of the density of their distribution in time and space. We decided to resolve dilemmas about inclusion and exclusion, and the taxonomy and format of individual data items in the database, as we came into contact with the material. At the moment, the database contains information on the range, focus and development of institutions, such as the type of institution, size of collection, classification of collection, spatial resources, location, year of the institution’s establishment, year of the collection’s establishment, number of visitors, data about architecture, management, etc.

The database is a tool in development which allows us, with the aid of software, to discover the correlation between a great number of data items which may, but need not be mutually related in terms of history or art history, but which have similarities according to selected parameters. So, at the click of a mouse, museums of modern art, opened in the 1950s, that have international collections, containing over a thousand exhibits, can be grouped together. It is immediately evident, for example, which geographic regions have the greatest numbers of such institutions. Although we are convinced that the density of institutions distributed in a particular area conditions the narrative of modern and contemporary art, we have not delved into interpreting such relations in ‘Stories About Frames’.

[Between 1998 and 2002, while Sanja Iveković was working on the Women’s House project, the reconstruction of an abandoned industrial mill was carried out in Gateshead, Great Britain. This involved investments of 50 million pounds, of which 33.4 million came from the Arts Council Lottery Fund. In 2002, the Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art was completed.]

The infrastructure of art institutions usually remains invisible to the visitors, so as to make room for the story of art. During our time at the museum, we were able to observe the museum as a place of the everyday: its maintenance, servicing, moving around, building and taking apart… Any attempt to mimic the working of a museum had to take place on the borderline between the visible and invisible. We placed our collection of institutions of modern and contemporary art in the locations in the exhibition space managed by the administration and technical staff. Thus, we consciously placed our work in the domain of the invisible, reproductive, women’s work or dark matter3 of the art world. ‘Stories About Frames’ took on the form of museum labels, or elements of exhibition signalization, that is, standard methods through which institutions provide information about the characteristics of displayed works, such as techniques and technology, authorship, time of creation, and their significance in the context of art generally and the collection in particular. Instead of such details, the labels which we made introduce into the exhibition space information on other institutions of modern and contemporary art that were by then entered in our database. Each label is linked to one or more works, so that it provides information from the database related to the period when the work of art was created. Standardised captions were formatted as follows:

In year N, when X made Y, Z occurred.

N, X and Y are appropriated from the ‘official’ caption, while Z is retrieved from our database. By relying on factography, the authority of an objective statement is achieved, in spite of the lack of any previous historical or biographical link between the information given. ‘Stories About Frames’ is an attempt to create disruptions in the exhibition space, conceived as a series of fissures in the epidermis of museum presentation, through which details are glimpsed of the material reality of the art world beyond the walls of the specific museum in which the labels are found. Thus, we attempted to shatter the whole, coherent narrative of the exhibition, by constantly pointing to other places and other institutions.

The time when a work was made is the only parameter of the database query, determining the information selected which, along with the name of the author and the title of the work, appears on the labels. The time when the artwork was created, as a moment when a unique creative act occurred, is combined with information about the vast machinery of the production and consumption of art — the prerequisite for a creation of an artwork. At the same time, the selection of the institutions listed on the labels does not take into account the degree of their influence on art historical canon. Key institutions, personalities and exhibitions appear on our labels, as well as peripheral ones which support the art system and, by their very existence, contribute to the significance of canonical institutions, personalities and works.

[In 1993, when Mladen Stilinović made An Artist Who Cannot Speak English is No Artist, Zagreb City Council granted the Croatian Association of Artists (HDLU) permission to move into Meštrović’s pavilion.]

Working on the ‘Stories About Frames’ project gave us the opportunity to observe a museum collection not as the public, but as the administration and technical museum staff does. Although we got to know the collection display in detail, we mastered the works as an inventory. In spite of our detailed insight into the arrangement of the works in space, the colour of the walls in individual rooms, the working or non-working state of the equipment, the security protocols, etc., we are not necessarily better informed about the contents of the works in the collection. The reactions of some visitors who approached us, thinking we were museum staff, demonstrated that ‘Stories About Frames’ are often not read as a series of artistic interventions, but as deviations in the behaviour of the museum. One visitor described his frustration regarding the labels as follows. “When I visit a museum in Zagreb, I want to know something about the context. When I read the label of a work, I want to get closer to that work. These labels keep throwing me off track, talking about Istanbul, Brussels, or Budapest. They seem to be here to explode the artwork.”

1 “Istorija Muzeja moderne umetnosti”, Goran Đorđević, kuda.lounge 2005, http://www.kuda.org/en/history-and-museum-modern-art-goran-or-evi, (24.07.2016.)
2 “My Dear, This Is Not What It Seems to Be”, pp. 30-31, Walter Benjamin, Recent Writings, 2013, New Documents (paraphrase).
3 Dark Matter: Art and Politics in the Age of Enterprise Culture, Gregory Sholette, Pluto Press, 2011


HOW-TO. International seminar

Presentation of the research carried out as part of How to Do Things with Documents and the network of European projects Performing the Museum.

The Fundació Antoni Tàpies has made available its archive, documentation, the Museum and its history, for this project of research and reflection on cultural practices. Roger Bernat, Lúa Coderch, Experimentem amb l’ART, LaFundició, Objetologías and Pep Vidal have put forward new ways of using them in order to question museum and archive practices at present.

These processes and collaborations aim to highlight the need to coordinate research and alternative ways of conducting artistic practices and processes of cultural mediation. Depending on the availability of resources, the question behind this transformation should be: To what extent can the museum be prefigured as an open and changing resource, adaptable to the interactions established with every user?

Calendar:

Wednesday 2 December, 18 h

- Oriol Fontdevila and Núria Solé Bardalet: How to Do Things with an Archive
- Pep Vidal: Nail to Nail to Nail
- Objectologies: Not Yet Know: Surprise Ontologies and Agency- Fiction
- Experimentem amb l’ART: Institutional Fissures in the Concept of Opening
- Andreja Hribernik: How to Do Things with Museums

Thursday 3 December, 18 h

- LaFundició: CICdB Archive
- Lúa Coderch: Screen Walls [Dealing with the Wind and not with Gravity]
- Matteo Sisti: FAT QUIZ, 2015 by Roger Bernat
- Mirjana Dusic Lazic: How to Do Things with Museum Publications
- Jasna Jaksic and Dunja Kucinac: How to Do Things with Collections

Language: English
Free admission


Stories of frames.

At the end of 2014, when we were invited to participate in the "Performing the Museum" project, which would enable us to work with the museum resources, our interest was in accessing the contents of the archives, library and collection. As the project developed and we spent time and worked in the museum, it turned out that we would be less interested in the contents at the disposal of the museum, and more in the (work of the) museum itself. In a specific way, the ‘Performing the Museum’ project made us focus on inter-museum communication — between the interpreters, the institution, and its staff.

In the early phase of the research, we learned how the ‘Didactic Exhibition’ was staged in 1957 by the Gallery of Contemporary Art in Zagreb (now the Museum of Contemporary Art). This exhibition, performed by the museum, did not present works of art. Instead, via reproductions of canonical works of art, it made the subject of its presentation the (western) modernist, art-historical canon. Without concealing its role models, the ‘Didactic Exhibition’ in fact started with a translation of the diagram ‘Cubism and Abstract Art’. The three-year-old Gallery thus heralded its future
programme and field of reference in the context of the still relatively unstable position of modern art in Yugoslavia. Deliberately or not, by appropriating existing material and adding typed explanations, the Gallery strove to legitimise its future work by performing the story of modern art, as an American story about European artefacts.1

Although the ‘Didactic Exhibition’, as an explicit example of revealing one’s own ideology, could be interpreted as a harbinger of new institutionalism, it was a performative utterance rather than a practice of critical museology. On the other hand, the recreation of the ‘Didactic Exhibition’ today reveals the interpretative mechanisms of the museum. Perhaps the most interesting example of similar practice can be found in recreations of canonical exhibitions such as ‘The Last Futurist Exhibition’, or ‘An International Exhibition of Modern Art – Armory Show’, by Goran Đorđević. In his reading, an art institution is a collective term for a system of beliefs, or ideology of art history, whose basic cultural artefacts are objects which today we call works of art, but which at some future time may become something else, just as religious paintings or African masks used to have different social functions before they entered the museum.2

While Goran Đorđević points to the key historical manifestations, institutions and personalities of the art world in order to speak about the emergence and development of ideology of art history, his work simultaneously implies a question: what remains of the art institution if we place ourselves outside the story of art history? The initial motivation for the ‘Stories About Frames’ project, which we realised through ‘Performing the Museum’, was for us a kind of exploration of this question. We decided to shift our focus from artistic discourse to the material reality of art institutions. In doing so, we did not concentrate on art objects, but on institutions of modern and contemporary art, treating them as the cultural artefacts which participate in the creation of the story of art history. For the purposes of our research, we borrowed some of the methods and tools used in empirical research. We decided to create a digital database to gather and organise information on institutions of modern and contemporary art. Such tools were to provide us with an objective view from the outside, while striving to exclude or minimise qualitative judgments at the moment of organising and selecting the data. The database began as an expression of our desire to include existing institutions of modern and contemporary art worldwide, from their inception to the present day, in order to achieve a picture of the density of their distribution in time and space. We decided to resolve dilemmas about inclusion and exclusion, and the taxonomy and format of individual data items in the database, as we came into contact with the material. At the moment, the database contains information on the range, focus and development of institutions, such as the type of institution, size of collection, classification of collection, spatial resources, location, year of the institution’s establishment, year of the collection’s establishment, number of visitors, data about architecture, management, etc.

The database is a tool in development which allows us, with the aid of software, to discover the correlation between a great number of data items which may, but need not be mutually related in terms of history or art history, but which have similarities according to selected parameters. So, at the click of a mouse, museums of modern art, opened in the 1950s, that have international collections, containing over a thousand exhibits, can be grouped together. It is immediately evident, for example, which geographic regions have the greatest numbers of such institutions. Although we are convinced that the density of institutions distributed in a particular area conditions the narrative of modern and contemporary art, we have not delved into interpreting such relations in ‘Stories About Frames’.

[Between 1998 and 2002, while Sanja Iveković was working on the Women’s House project, the reconstruction of an abandoned industrial mill was carried out in Gateshead, Great Britain. This involved investments of 50 million pounds, of which 33.4 million came from the Arts Council Lottery Fund. In 2002, the Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art was completed.]

The infrastructure of art institutions usually remains invisible to the visitors, so as to make room for the story of art. During our time at the museum, we were able to observe the museum as a place of the everyday: its maintenance, servicing, moving around, building and taking apart… Any attempt to mimic the working of a museum had to take place on the borderline between the visible and invisible. We placed our collection of institutions of modern and contemporary art in the locations in the exhibition space managed by the administration and technical staff. Thus, we consciously placed our work in the domain of the invisible, reproductive, women’s work or dark matter3 of the art world. ‘Stories About Frames’ took on the form of museum labels, or elements of exhibition signalization, that is, standard methods through which institutions provide information about the characteristics of displayed works, such as techniques and technology, authorship, time of creation, and their significance in the context of art generally and the collection in particular. Instead of such details, the labels which we made introduce into the exhibition space information on other institutions of modern and contemporary art that were by then entered in our database. Each label is linked to one or more works, so that it provides information from the database related to the period when the work of art was created. Standardised captions were formatted as follows:

In year N, when X made Y, Z occurred.

N, X and Y are appropriated from the ‘official’ caption, while Z is retrieved from our database. By relying on factography, the authority of an objective statement is achieved, in spite of the lack of any previous historical or biographical link between the information given. ‘Stories About Frames’ is an attempt to create disruptions in the exhibition space, conceived as a series of fissures in the epidermis of museum presentation, through which details are glimpsed of the material reality of the art world beyond the walls of the specific museum in which the labels are found. Thus, we attempted to shatter the whole, coherent narrative of the exhibition, by constantly pointing to other places and other institutions.

The time when a work was made is the only parameter of the database query, determining the information selected which, along with the name of the author and the title of the work, appears on the labels. The time when the artwork was created, as a moment when a unique creative act occurred, is combined with information about the vast machinery of the production and consumption of art — the prerequisite for a creation of an artwork. At the same time, the selection of the institutions listed on the labels does not take into account the degree of their influence on art historical canon. Key institutions, personalities and exhibitions appear on our labels, as well as peripheral ones which support the art system and, by their very existence, contribute to the significance of canonical institutions, personalities and works.

[In 1993, when Mladen Stilinović made An Artist Who Cannot Speak English is No Artist, Zagreb City Council granted the Croatian Association of Artists (HDLU) permission to move into Meštrović’s pavilion.]

Working on the ‘Stories About Frames’ project gave us the opportunity to observe a museum collection not as the public, but as the administration and technical museum staff does. Although we got to know the collection display in detail, we mastered the works as an inventory. In spite of our detailed insight into the arrangement of the works in space, the colour of the walls in individual rooms, the working or non-working state of the equipment, the security protocols, etc., we are not necessarily better informed about the contents of the works in the collection. The reactions of some visitors who approached us, thinking we were museum staff, demonstrated that ‘Stories About Frames’ are often not read as a series of artistic interventions, but as deviations in the behaviour of the museum. One visitor described his frustration regarding the labels as follows. “When I visit a museum in Zagreb, I want to know something about the context. When I read the label of a work, I want to get closer to that work. These labels keep throwing me off track, talking about Istanbul, Brussels, or Budapest. They seem to be here to explode the artwork.”

1 “Istorija Muzeja moderne umetnosti”, Goran Đorđević, kuda.lounge 2005, http://www.kuda.org/en/history-and-museum-modern-art-goran-or-evi, (24.07.2016.)
2 “My Dear, This Is Not What It Seems to Be”, pp. 30-31, Walter Benjamin, Recent Writings, 2013, New Documents (paraphrase).
3 Dark Matter: Art and Politics in the Age of Enterprise Culture, Gregory Sholette, Pluto Press, 2011


Thilo Funder: Nicholas Brady (Target Audience/Ciljna publika)

Video presentation:

A group of teenagers are moving through the exhibition spaces, archives and basement hallways of the Museum of Contemporary Art in Zagreb, always returning to the first Croatian Avant-garde painting, Pa-fa-ma by Josip Seissel. Their movements recall the impulsive energy of playground during recess. The strange game of hide-and-seek that plays out among the modern artworks might also evoke the imagery of high school shootings. The museum is depicted in a sort of hostage situation – the art museum is under siege and this nervous eerie situation plays out playfully in the museums permanent collection. Somewhere else Philip K. Dick’s character Nicolas Brady is being induced with a telepathic stream of handheld video footage of secret modern art collection concealed in a bunker in Leningrad. And endless torrent of modern classics, disturbingly exceeding any realistic volume of such productions, bombards his consciousness and ignites a new critical sight. This epiphanic video transmission is relayed to Nicolas Brady via the godlike satellite Valis. In Nichloas Brady (Target Audience) the satellite takes the shape of Josip Seissel’s Pa-fa-ma and the solid modernistic formations slowly revolves and turns on its on axis, spinning silently through space. In a playful clash between the expressive movements of the youngsters in the fixed structure of the museum space and the odd potential of new imagined art collections through fiction literature, Nicolas Brady (Target Audience) creates a tiny orbit around a modernistic satellite invested in the hidden power relations in the architecture and structure of the (art)museum and the history of Croatian and international avantgarde art.


Jasmina Cibic. KINO UMJETNIKA - CINEMA ARTISTS

Presentation of Jasmina Cibic work as part of the CINEMA ARTISTS, held in the framework of Performing the Museum.

Program:
Tear Down and rebuild, 2015 - 15.30 min
The Nation loves it, 2015 - 15.45 min
The Double Game, 2014 - 2.37 min
Framing the Space, 2013 - 10.45 min
The Pavilion, 2015 - 6.45 min


Jasmina Cibic: The Pavilion/Paviljon

5. 4. 2016 - 22. 5. 2016 video presentation
29. 3. 2016 conversation with the author


Pilvi Takala. KINO UMJETNIKA - CINEMA ARTISTS

Presentation of Pilvi Takala work as part of the CINEMA ARTISTS, held in the framework of Performing the Museum.

After presentation of artworks done by Jasmina Cibic, MSU Zagreb is bringing another guest artist - Pilvi Takala. Artworks and film production of this artis from Finland is based on research of different social structures in different cultural contexts. She takes on the position of a director and the viewer become the real actor in her stories. By analyzing social topics and situations such as dreams coming true and money approation, she focuses our attention on disruption of borders and rules to show the real social situations.

Program:
Real Snow White (2009), 9:15 min / Players (2010), 7:50 min / Drive With Care (2013), 13 min /
The Committee (2015) 15 min / Workers Forum (2015), 6:23 min

Q&A: Jasna Jakšić, curator of the project “Performing the Museum”


Big Museum Heist

In the exhibition spaces of the Museum of Contemporary Art Zagreb a group of young boys and girls are planning a major art heist. A specific piece of art is at the center of their attention and by the end of the day the artwork will be theirs. To get to the chosen piece of art, will require quite some planning, attention, focus and most important a collective effort. The museum must be mapped out, guard routines recorded and alarm systems bypassed.

Big Museum Heist combines close discussions on the value set of art, the role of art and the museum in cultural identity as well as popular fiction, with a series of physical and fun exercises. Through a fictive scenario of a meticulously orchestrated museum heist, the workshop sets out to do a collective “mapping” of the museum space, building a different understanding of the art collection, the museum architecture and the daily routines of the museum. The participants will work in teams spotting for cameras, guard routines – drawing maps and timetables of the architecture and different routines of the museum and its staff. A detailed plan for the heist will be sketched out in group collaboration and finally a maze of laser alarms will have to be navigated through, in order to get to the art work.

The workshop will be held in a fun and warm tone playing with the fictive universe of Hollywood Movies. The participants will have to combine skills of observation, concentration, idea making, teamwork and physical movements, within a nuanced dialogue about the more general roles of art, museums, spectators and value. What is art? What is its value? How is value defined? How does the architecture of the museum work? What is fiction and what is reality?

Danish artists Tina Helen and Soren Thilo Funder will conduct the workshop. The workshop will last three hours and Croatian assistants will be present for translation.


didactic exhibition

This historical, pioneering educational project, created in 1957 by the former City Gallery of Contemporary Art, and conceived as a travelling exhibition, aimed at educating the public about contemporary and abstract art. On ninety-two panels featuring photographs and reproductions from books and magazines, the Didactic Exhibition told the story of the emergence of abstract art, from Paul Cezanne to 1957.
The concept itself stepped beyond the format of museum education. The motivation behind it was an exhibition of prints by members of the Parisian Espace Group, Edgard Pillet, Victor Vasarely and André Bloc, proposed by the art critic Josip Depolo. Ivan Picelj, Radoslav Putar, Tihana RavliÊ, Vjenceslav Richter, Neven ©egviÊ and, on behalf of the Gallery of Contemporary Art, Vesna BarbiÊ and Edo KovaËeviÊ, selected the reproductions, exhibition set-up, and caption translations. Ivan Picelj created the exhibition poster, invitation and catalogue, and in his archive today, texts and photographs used to prepare the panels can be seen. On the other hand, according to the minutes of meetings of the Gallery’s expert council, Vjenceslav Richter was entrusted with the task of making the panels. Sadly, there is no evidence in his archive to support this claim.


Lecture and workshop: Roger Bernat and Roberto Frattini

In the framework of educational exhibition Roger Bernat, an artist from Barcelona, invite the audience to examine their knowledge of the Zagreb Museum of Contemporary Art. In the form of a questionnaire, that the visitors has to answer, the audience are required to recognize the ills of an art institution and its material defects, but also learn more about the relationship between an institution to its customers and artists.


Abstract Socialism. Stories about frames

Stories about Frames is a (con)textual intervention within the current display of the Collection of the Fundació, Antoni Tàpies. Collection, 1955–65. Fokus Grupa has created a system of alternative labels that reference the years in which these works by Antoni Tàpies were created, raising links with the configuration of the contemporary art system during the years of the Cold War. In this sense, each work is viewed separately, although rather than revealing its particular physical properties, each new label refers to the material reality of the art world.

Fokus Grupa is a collective from Rijeka, formed by Iva Kovač and Elvis Krstulović. They
define their practice as interdisciplinary, seeing art as a material practice that needs to
be addressed according to its legal, economic and social implications.


Abstract Socialism: conferences and artistic projects

Programme of conferences and artistic projects on the current and past uses of modern art arising from the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. Curated by Oriol Fontdevila. Abstract Socialism is the second part of Performing the Museum project.

May 4, 6pm
Presentation programme and conversation with the artists
With Jasmina Cibic, Fokus Grupa and Søren Thilo Funder
Free admission—Auditorium. Limited places

May 4, 6:30pm / May 11 and 18, 5:30pm
Programme of projections
Featuring works by Jasmina Cibic, Søren Thilo Funder and Doplgenger
Free admission—Auditorium. Limited places

May 13, 5pm / May 14, 8pm
Lectures
With Andreja Hribernik, Ljiljana Kolešnik, Dalibor Martinis, Aleksandra Sekulić, Barbara Steiner and Ana Dević from What, How & for Whom/WHW
Free admission—Auditorium. Limited places

May 4–22
Artistic intervention
Fokus Grupa in Antoni Tàpies. Collection, 1955–65
Permanent Collection. Level 1.

Abstract Socialism
During the early years of the Cold War, the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia took an unexpected stand in relation to modern art. Artists and intellectuals embraced abstract art, while the country’s cultural policy also saw it as a possibility for educating the people and for social progress. Yugoslavia distanced itself from the Soviet Union’s condemnation of abstraction, yet was never totally behind the formalist ideas currently fashionable in North America.

The Yugoslav context has contributed to later generations of artists questioning the basis of what has been called socialist modernity. Yet it also seems that the principle of utopia that nourished this project has never ceased to be recognised and is received as an inheritance with which to challenge the amnesiac state informing museums and the cultural neoliberal policies of today.

Abstract Socialism is a programme of conferences and artistic projects on the current and past uses of modern art arising from the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. It focuses on contemporary art practices that establish alliances with this legacy, albeit in a disruptive key, as well as historiographical accounts pointing to a critical review of the political and cultural initiatives that previously served to promote modern and progressive art.


Abstract Socialism. Presentation Programme and Conversations with the artists

Abstract Socialism. Programme of videos

The Yugoslav Pavilion at the Barcelona International Exposition (1929), the first Croatian work of abstract art (Pafama, 1922), the Palace of the Federation in Belgrade (1961) and some reels of Radio Television Novi Sad from the 1950s, all come to life in the hands of Jasmina Cibic, Søren Thilo Funder and Doplgenger. More than strict historical research, these videos revisit controversial cases that occurred in the Yugoslav context of the interwar years and the Cold War through a process of appropriation, deviation and even deliberate fictionalisation. The aim is to address debates that relate to cultural policies rather than art history: what are and were the uses of artistic practice in respect to politics? And, as for memory, to what extent is it useful to investigate the conditions that should have made possible certain utopias that were never realised?

Jasmina Cibic is a visual artist living between London and Ljubljana, whose work is based on the reinterpretation of Yugoslavia’s political and cultural legacy. Doplgenger is a collective formed by Isidora Ilić and Boško Prostran, two Belgrade artists whose work explores the regimes of visuality and reception of the moving image. Søren Thilo Funder is an artist from Copenhagen whose work explores the disruptive potential of nostalgia and counter-memory.

Jasmina Cibic. The Pavillion, 2015. 6’46’’
Jasmina Cibic. Spielraum: Tear Down and Rebuild, 2015. 15’28’’
Søren Thilo Funder. Nicholas Brady (Target Audience), 2016. 12’13”
Doplgenger. Beneath a Starless Sky and Thick as Ink, 2015. 16´20”


Abstract Socialism. Lectures programme

Abstract Socialism
What role does artistic practice play today when Utopia seems to be something of the past?

During the early years of the Cold War, the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia took an unexpected stand in relation to modern art. Artists and intellectuals embraced abstract art, while the country’s cultural policy also saw it as a possibility for educating the people and for social progress. Yugoslavia distanced itself from the Soviet Union’s condemnation of abstraction, yet was never totally behind the formalist ideas currently fashionable in North America.

The Yugoslav context has contributed to later generations of artists questioning the basis of what has been called socialist modernity. Yet it also seems that the principle of utopia that nourished this project has never ceased to be recognised and is received as an inheritance with which to challenge the amnesiac state informing museums and the cultural neoliberal policies of today.

Abstract socialism is a programme of conferences and artistic projects on the current and past uses of modern art arising from the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. It focuses on contemporary art practices that establish alliances with this legacy, albeit in a disruptive
key, as well as historiographical accounts pointing to a critical review of the political and cultural initiatives that previously served to promote modern and progressive art.


Andreja Kulunčić: Performing the Exhibition. ART ACT BOX. #1 Zagreb

13 September 2016 – Library, Pešćenica, Zagreb


Andreja Kulunčić: Performing the Exhibition. ART ACT BOX.

Can everyday objects – a mirror, sellotape, pencils and markers – become artistic materials? Can a walk home be considered an artistic happening? What creative tools did artists of the 1960s and 1970s use to express their critical thinking and communicate with their public and the community?
Discover the answers at Performing the Exhibition: ART-ACT-BOX. Guided by a dance artist who uses items from a box, gestures and speech to perform some pieces by the artists in question, the public is involved as living elements of the choreography and become exhibition performers themselves. The number of participant is limited to 20.

ART-ACT-BOX was realised as part of the Performing the Museum project, co-financed by the European Commission, supported by the Ministry of Culture of the Republic of Croatia, the Ministry of Culture of the Republic of Slovenia, the Regional Secretariat for Culture and Information of the Autonomous Province of Vojvodina, and the Ministry of Culture and Information of the Republic of Serbia.
ART-ACT-BOX is an educational project and is performed exclusively outside museums and galleries. The materials are used solely for educational, non-commercial purposes.


Andreja Kulunčić: Performing the Exhibition. ART ACT BOX. #2 Zagreb

21 September 2016 – Local council, Žitnjak, Zagreb


Doplgenger Politics of Amateur

9. 6. 2016 – 26. 6. 2016 Video presentation
Beneath a Starless Sky as dark and Thick as Ink/Skozi noč brez zvezd, temno in gosto kot črnilo

25. 5. 2016 Conversation with the authors
Doplgenger Politics of Amateur


Andreja Kulunčić: Performing the Exhibition. ART ACT BOX. #3 Zagreb

28 September 2016 – Psychiatric hospital, Jankomir, Zagreb


Andreja Kulunčić: Performing the Exhibition. ART ACT BOX. #1 Barcelona

Preformance carried out at the Escola Solc School. 7 October 2016, Barcelona
Group 1


Andreja Kulunčić: Performing the Exhibition. ART ACT BOX. #3 Barcelona

Preformance carried out at the Escola El Puig School. 10 October 2016, Esparreguera
Group 1


Andreja Kulunčić: Performing the Exhibition. ART ACT BOX. 1# Slovenj Gradec

14 October 2016. 9:00 h
Preformance carried out at the Koroški dom starostnikov/Carinthian retirement home, Slovenj Gradec.


FOCUS GROUP: THE CENTRE OF THE WORLD – neon sign

When conceiving this project, the authors used as their starting point a newspaper article from 9 December 1966, which is kept by the Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art Koroška (KGLU) in its archive. The article reports about the exhibition Peace, Humanity and Friendship among Nations, which opened the following day. The author of the article writes: “Tomorrow, Slovenj Gradec will become the centre of the world. The world that – like every resident of Slovenj Gradec – experiences culture as an inner need. The world fighting for peace, humanity among people. For friendship, the real thing, not just friendship on paper, on posters, in books, in words…” The neon sign will be placed on the façade of the building housing KGLU. It thus carries a historical message while it also broaches the permanently topical political subject of war and peace.


Lúa Coderch – video projections

Lúa Coderch is a Peruvian artist living and working in Barcelona. KGLU will introduce her with two videos thematising shelters, which she has been constructing using various materials. She see shelters as a metaphor for our existence on Earth.

Works:
Night in a remote cottage illuminated by a kerosene lamp, video, 11’ 30"
Screen wall (when we are dealing with wind and not gravitation), video, 7’ 32"


Presentation of DIGITAL EDUCATIONAL PORTAL

Through games and a story, children get to know the basic concepts associated with the museum or the gallery and the collections of our partner museums. Adults enter the field of contemporary art through an explanation of select concepts. The concepts may be used as educational tools and guidelines that can help us navigate the broad field of contemporary plural art practices.

Author and Editor: Katarina Hergold Germ
Illustrations: Djordje Balmazović (ŠKART)
Web Design: Vikida, Ana Korenini s.p.
Creative programming: Slavko Glamočanin

www.discoveringart.eu


DIDACTIC EXHIBITION

The didactic exhibition was founded in 1957 upon the initiative of the art critic Josip Depol and the conceptual group Exat 51. It is conceived as a travelling exhibition consisting of 92 panels representing the history of global contemporary and abstract art from the late 19th century to the artistic trends of the 1950s. In Slovenj Gradec, a selection of the panels will be exhibited. Today, the exhibition should be viewed in the light of its topicality at the time of its conception. However, consistent with its purpose, it is set up outside the gallery and museum spaces and thus made accessible to the widest possible audience.


Andreja Kulunčić: Performing the Exhibition. ART ACT BOX. 4# Slovenj Gradec

24 October 2016. 12:00 h
Preformance carried out at the Mladinski kulturni center / Youth Cultural Center, Slovenj Gradec.


Karol Radziszewski: Queer Archives Institute

On October 25, (11 AM– 6 PM), alongside collaborators, graphic designer Rafaela Dražić, filmmaker Ana Opalić and others, Radziszewski will present his research and the activities of the Queer Archives Institute via pop-up intervention in his temporary office located in the permanent collection of The Museum of Contemporary Art. Queer Archives Institute temporary office will also present the final stage of the preparation of DIK Fagazine special edition dedicated to the history and the collections of the Museum of Contemporary Art in Zagreb.

In his work, the artist Karol Radziszewski aims to retrieve the discarded, neglected, and minor from the dominant discourse of art history, accessing stories which have been considered less important or offensive, such as female art, queer art and sexuality. During his residency in Zagreb, Radziszewski engaged not only with certain parts of the MSU collection, but also with historical events and characters, which of course contributed to the inclusion of parts of the untold history of the LGBT culture and the history in which institutional and non-institutional art history intersect.

Karol Radzizsewski’s artist-in-residence is part of the Performing the Museum program. Performing the Museum project is co –funded by the EU’s Creative Europe program, by the Ministry of Culture of the Republic of Croatia.

Queer Archives Institute special appearance in MSU permanent collections organized in collaboration with Queer Zagreb Season.


Andreja Kulunčić: Performing the Exhibition. ART ACT BOX. #5 Barcelona

Preformance carried out at the Cavall Bernat School. 27 October 2016, Barcelona


Archives and Power II. Symposium

Program:
18:00-18:30 Aleksandra Sekulić, Dušan Grlja, Presentation of the reader Performing the Museum
18:30-19:00 Nika Autor, artist presentation
19:00-19:30 Lila Coderch, artist presentation
19:30-20:00 Fokus grupa, art group presentation
20:00-20:30 Katarina Hergold: Presentation of Digital Education Portal: discoveringart.eu


Archives and Power II. Exhibition

The international project Performing the Museum, in 2016 edition at the Museum of Contemporary Art of Vojvodina (MSUV) presents the group exhibition Archives and Power and the symposium.

The exhibition Archives and Power presents the artworks that deal with exploring the museums’ collections and reinterpreting certain public and private archive wholes and their discursive deposits, as well as the artistic interventions within the context of analysing the relationship between the institution and its symbolic power in the creation of history. Artists proceed from selected case studies from the past or a terminological register as a resource which they recontextualise through a new performance.

The first edition of the exhibition Archives and Power was presented on November 2015.
The project Performing the Museum of the Museum of Contemporary Art of Vojvodina is realised through partnership cooperation with the following institutions: the Museum of Contemporary Art in Zagreb, Museum of Modern Art Koroška in Slovenj Gradec and the Fundació Antoni Tàpies from Barcelona.


Archives and Power II. Exhibition. opening

Andreja Kulunčić: Performing the Exhibition. ART ACT BOX. #1 Novi Sad

31 October 2016 - High school, Sremski Karlovci, Novi Sad